How does the electric field at a point due to a short dipole vary with the distance?

For an electric dipole (at large distances), The electric potential varies inversely with the square of the distance. For a point charge, The electric potential varies inversely with the distance.

How does the electric potential at a point due to an electric dipole vary with?

The electric potential due to an electric dipole varies inversely to the square of the distance i.e. $dfrac{{{1}}}{{{{{r}}^{{2}}}}}$ and the potential due to a single point charge varies inversely to the distance i.e. $dfrac{{{1}}}{{{r}}}$.

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How does the electric potential at a point due to an electric dipole vary with distance measured from its center compare the same for a point charge?

Electric potential is inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the centre of the dipole (i.e. V ∝ 1 r 2 ). Where as the potential due to point charge is inversely proportional with the distance from the charge (i.e. V ∝ 1 r ).

How does electric field strength change with distance from a short dipole?

Along axis of dipole (Point Q)

Compared to a point charge which only decreases as the inverse of the square of the distance, the dipoles field decreases much faster because it contains both a positive and negative charge.

How does the electric potential at a point vary with distance due to point charge and dipole?

Potential at a point due to single point charge depends only upon the distance r while due to an electric dipole depends upon the distance r and inclination of r. … Potential due to a single point charge varies as Voc while potential due to dipole varies as V.

How does the electric field at a point vary with distance from a point electric charge?

The electric field varies inversely as the square of the distance from the point charge.

What is electric potential at a point on the axis of the dipole?

The electric potential at a point situated at a distance r on the axis of a short electric dipole of moment p will be 1/4(πε0) times.

What is the electric potential at a point in an electric field?

Electric potential at a point in an electric field, is defined as the amount of work done in order to move a unit positive charge from infinity to that point along any path, against the electrostatic forces, with acceleration zero.

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What is electric field due to a point charge?

The electric field due to a given electric charge Q is defined as the space around the charge in which electrostatic force of attraction or repulsion due to the charge Q can be experienced by another charge q.

What is the electric potential due to a point charge?

The electric potential at a point in an electric field is defined as the amount of work done in moving a unit positive charge from infinity to that point along any path when the electrostatic forces are applied.

How does the strength of the electric field due to a dipole depend on how far away R you are from it?

The electric field strength due to a dipole, far away, is always proportional to the dipole moment and inversely proportional to the cube of the distance. Dipole moment is the product of the charge and distance between the two charges.

How does electric field vary with distance?

Electric field strength is location dependent, and its magnitude decreases as the distance from a location to the source increases. And by whatever factor the distance is changed, the electric field strength will change inversely by the square of that factor.

Why the electric field of a dipole decreases faster with distance than that of a point charge?

Because an electric dipole consists of two opposite charges, the electric field decreases more rapidly compared to the 1/r^2 character of a single charge. In fact, for the electric dipole the field decreases as 1/r^3 with distance. It is also not symmetrical with angle around the dipole.

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How does the electric field due to an infinite line of charge vary with the distance from the line?

We have found that the electric field is directed radially away from the line charge, and decreases in magnitude in inverse proportion to distance from the line charge.