Can electric shock affect your heart?

If a current of 50 mA passes through the heart, it can cause cardiac arrest. The heart is also a muscle, which beats to pump blood through the body. The rhythm of our heartbeat is controlled by electric impulses—it is these impulses that are monitored by an electrocardiogram.

Can electric shock cause heart problems?

The heart is one of the most susceptible organs to electrical injury. Electrical shock may cause direct myocardial necrosis or cardiac arrhythmias. Asystole and ventricular fibrillation are the most serious arrhythmic complications of electrical injury.

What happens to your heart when you are electrocuted?

Electric shock from low voltage current with amps as low as 60 mA can cause ventricular fibrillation in the heart. Ventricular fibrillation, or Vfib, is the most serious form of heart arrhythmia, and it prevents the heart from pumping blood. This results in cardiac arrest.

Which organ is mainly affected by electric shock?

An electric shock may directly cause death in three ways: paralysis of the breathing centre in the brain, paralysis of the heart, or ventricular fibrillation (uncontrolled, extremely rapid twitching of the heart muscle).

When should I go to the doctor after electric shock?

Following a low-voltage shock, go to the emergency department for the following concerns: Any noticeable burn to the skin. Any period of unconsciousness. Any numbness, tingling, paralysis, vision, hearing, or speech problems.

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Do I need an ECG after an electric shock?

So when assessing patients after an electric shock, these reports confirm that one can be confident that if the patient is asymptomatic and has a normal ECG, cardiac monitoring is not required. This is reassuring for both patients and staff. Delayed lethal arrhythmia must be exceptionally rare.